Cape Cod Bay Fishing Report | August 11, 2016

The good news this week from the bay is that there are a number of places where there has been good fishing for larger bass, meaning that there might be some relief from the crowding and bad behavior around Sandwich.

Rob LaBranche reported that Race Point/Provincetown is once again producing good numbers of quality bass, especially for anglers who are vertical jigging. Odds are that these fish are feeding on sand eels, so take that into consideration if they won’t take A17 or A27 diamond jigs matched up with green tubes.

Billingsgate Shoal is also fishing better this week; you will have to pick through a number of smaller bass, but there are enough larger ones to make it interesting. Once again, umbrella rigs with red or green tubes and darker colored parachutes, such as purple, black/purple or red/black have been working; another popular local Cape Cod Bay color is a special dark rust color. Wire line is a must for getting down to the fish.

Wellfleet Harbor continues to produce a mix of bass and blues and Sunken Meadow is holding mostly bluefish; warmer water means best time for shore anglers looking for bass or blues from the beach between Eastham and Truro is early, early morning or nights.

Sean Hartley with a 47-inch, 40-pound bass caught earlier in the week in Cape Cod Bay.
Sean Hartley with a 47-inch, 40-pound bass caught earlier in the week in Cape Cod Bay.

Bath water around the Brewster Flats and the shallows from Barnstable to Sandwich means morning matched up with an incoming tide is the best option for finding any bass or blues; there continues to be some squid on the flats feeding on the sand eels, making larger soft plastics and flies, as well as spook style plugs, worth considering.

Boaters and kayakers continue to find schoolies on the edges of the channels up inside the harbor; anything that matches up with a sand eel is apparently working. Folks are picking up a few larger bass around the main channel on tubes or umbrella rigs, but it is a slow pick.

On the other hand, from Sandy Neck to Town Neck, there are still a lot of big bass being caught by boaters using sonar to locate schools and then dropping live eels on them. That said, sometimes the fish are in so tight to the sand that sonar doesn’t work and there have even been some reports of boats running aground while looking for bass. Some anglers are using rigged eels, meaning that even an eel that has died is worth keeping on ice in case you run out of livies.

Trisha McEachern is all smiles over this big striper she caught on a charter in Cape Cod Bay.
Trisha McEachern is all smiles over this big striper she caught on a charter in Cape Cod Bay.

Some boat anglers are also doing well on black or red tubes at night, and once the fleet scatters the fish, trolling tubes in deeper water, from 20+-feet and more, is a way to relocate schools of bass.

Shore anglers using eels and needlefish plugs are catching some larger bass along Sandy Neck, but there are also a larger number of mid to high 20-inch fish being caught by campers on seaworms. Those same size fish are prevalent around Town Neck for anglers tossing eels or swimming plugs, while up inside Old Harbor kayakers are trolling tubes with some success and flyrodders and light tackle anglers are picking up small schoolies.