How To: Searching for Bluefin South of Martha’s Vineyard

 

After hearing reports of life finally springing up south of Martha’s Vineyard on Sunday morning July 17, Capt. Terry Nugent & co. steamed 40 miles south in his Contender 33T Riptide to chase school-sized bluefin tuna.

Upon arrival, the crew searched in the fog for any signs of life before finally dialing in a few finback whales and a raft of shearwaters. They also noticed a large number of sand eels in the area, so a spread consisting primarily of dark olive and silver-colored SI Bulb Squids and Machine Bars was deployed.

During the next 7 hours, an epic bluefin bite ensued, resulting in a dozen knockdowns on the spread and fish ranging from 45 to just under 100 pounds.

Capt. Charlie Wade with the biggest bluefin of the day, estimated at between 85 and 100 pounds.
Capt. Charlie Wade with the biggest bluefin of the day, estimated at between 85 and 100 pounds.

During the morning bite, spreader bars trolled in tight near the wash seemed to be most effective, but by the afternoon, they had flipped to focus on the SI Splash Bird Bars trolled way way back.

The approximately 70 degree water south of the Vineyard in areas like the The Dump, Gordon’s Gully, and The Star have all been reported to be holding life, including other schools of bluefin and even a few white marlin.

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